Portfolio building

Part 1

Due to the nature of game development, you may often find that instead of applying for different studios using a CV and a detailed description of your past accomplishments, you could simply supply a portfolio which includes your work over the years, as well as a brief insight into your personality and what the employer could expect from you.

In my research, I have found three portfolios of interest, from which I can gather some important information about making my own portfolio.

  1. Gamepopper (Tim Stoddard)

Gamepopper is an indie game developer, who makes games in his free time. His website’s color scheme is in tone with the showcased games, all of which are quite dark, and not kid friendly. In his “about me” page, he goes over all his finished projects, as well as listing some smaller ones he created as part of game jam competitions over on itch.io, a website for indie game developers to publish their games on.

  1. Quichi (Ian)

Quichi’s portfolio is quite minimalistic in style, and also short on descriptions. This may be due to the fact that all the featured games on Quichi’s portfolio are small projects they worked on over the years, and as such may not be fully fleshed out games, or the artstyle just compliments this minimalistic style. 

  1. Joeb Rogers

This final portfolio I’ve selected belongs to a professional gameplay and tools engineer. This website is very detailed, offering a lot of information for potential employers, and at this high skill level that Joeb is operating, it’s important to not undersell yourself by not adding enough information. The portfolio contains a comprehensive list of his past working experience, what he worked on with different companies, as well as a number of smaller projects and assets he created for game jams or personal projects.

What I’ve learned/What I can use:

Your portfolio should be a reflection of not only your projects, but also your personality. They shouldn’t be generic and bland, instead you should try to innovate and add your own personality into the mix. Another important thing I have learned is that it is important to be aware of your own skill level, and not underestimate yourself in your portfolio, as that will most likely deter employers from choosing you over other people.

A comprehensive list of all the projects that you’ve worked on is important, as it gives the people reading your portfolio a general idea of the games you specialize in creating, and what you have experience with. You can and should also list some smaller achievements such as participating and winning in game jams or other similar competitions.

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